Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna) is a permanent resident from northern Baja California to Vancouver, British Columbia. Southern range

Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna) is a permanent resident from northern Baja California to Vancouver, British Columbia. Southern range extends into Arizona. Some populations move beyond resident range, extending up the Pacific Northwest, ending just short of Alaska. Historically, Anna's Hummingbird only bred in northern Baja California and southern California. Anna's have expanded their range to its current extent since the 1950s.

 

Being a permanent resident along the Pacific states, Anna's is the most common hummingbird in its range. Anna's thrive in a variety of habitats including city parks, apartment complexes, neighborhood gardens, chaparral, oak woodlands, coastal scrub. More common in lower elevations, though may wander to higher elevations in late summer.

Well known for feeding on nectar, whether from a flower or feeder, hummingbirds also feed on small insects on the wing. Somehow images of this behavior evoke visions of Jaws.

While not a songbird, Anna's Hummingbird has a distinct song that lasts 10 seconds or more. Learning the Anna's song helps one appreciate just how common this hummingbird really is. Once I myself learned the song I began hearing it just about everywhere and just about every time I went outside. It is typically the male who sings, though I believe I have observed females singing as well.

Male Anna's Hummingbird performs an impressive 12 second dive display. The male will hover in front of his intended audience at a distance of 2 to 4 meters and then climbs straight up, as much as 40 meters above the ground. He then plummets vertically into a curve. At the bottom of the curve he fans his tail feathers, creating a loud squeak. The display may be repeated several times.  

 

 

Being a permanent resident along the Pacific states, Anna's is the most common hummingbird in its range. Anna's thrive in a variety of habitats including city parks, apartment complexes, neighborhood gardens, chaparral, oak woodlands, coastal scrub. More common in lower elevations, though may wander to higher elevations in late summer.

Well known for feeding on nectar, whether from a flower or feeder, hummingbirds also feed on small insects on the wing. Somehow images of this behavior evoke visions of Jaws.

While not a songbird, Anna's Hummingbird has a distinct song that lasts 10 seconds or more. Learning the Anna's song helps one appreciate just how common this hummingbird really is. Once I myself learned the song I began hearing it just about everywhere and just about every time I went outside. It is typically the male who sings, though I believe I have observed females singing as well.

Male Anna's Hummingbird performs an impressive 12 second dive display. The male will hover in front of his intended audience at a distance of 2 to 4 meters and then climbs straight up, as much as 40 meters above the ground. He then plummets vertically into a curve. At the bottom of the curve he fans his tail feathers, creating a loud squeak. The display may be repeated several times.  

 

Anna's Hummingbird (Calypte anna) is a permanent resident from northern Baja California to Vancouver, British Columbia. Southern range extends into Arizona. Some populations move beyond resident range, extending up the Pacific Northwest, ending just short of Alaska. Historically, Anna's Hummingbird only bred in northern Baja California and southern California. Anna's have expanded their range to its current extent since the 1950s.

 

Being a permanent resident along the Pacific states, Anna's is the most common hummingbird in its range. Anna's thrive in a variety of habitats including city parks, apartment complexes, neighborhood gardens, chaparral, oak woodlands, coastal scrub. More common in lower elevations, though may wander to higher elevations in late summer.

Well known for feeding on nectar, whether from a flower or feeder, hummingbirds also feed on small insects on the wing. Somehow images of this behavior evoke visions of Jaws.

While not a songbird, Anna's Hummingbird has a distinct song that lasts 10 seconds or more. Learning the Anna's song helps one appreciate just how common this hummingbird really is. Once I myself learned the song I began hearing it just about everywhere and just about every time I went outside. It is typically the male who sings, though I believe I have observed females singing as well.

Male Anna's Hummingbird performs an impressive 12 second dive display. The male will hover in front of his intended audience at a distance of 2 to 4 meters and then climbs straight up, as much as 40 meters above the ground. He then plummets vertically into a curve. At the bottom of the curve he fans his tail feathers, creating a loud squeak. The display may be repeated several times.  

 



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